Cameras#

The pyvista.Camera class adds additional functionality and a pythonic API to the vtk.vtkCamera class. pyvista.Camera objects come with a default set of cameras that work well in most cases, but in many situations a more hands-on approach to using the camera is necessary.

Brief Example#

Create a frustum of camera, then create a scene of inside frustum.

import pyvista as pv
import numpy as np
import vtk
from pyvista import examples

pv.set_plot_theme("document")

camera = pv.Camera()
near_range = 0.3
far_range = 0.8
camera.clipping_range = (near_range, far_range)
unit_vector = np.array(camera.direction) / np.linalg.norm(
    np.array([camera.focal_point]) - np.array([camera.position])
)

frustum = camera.view_frustum(1.0)

position = camera.position
focal_point = camera.focal_point
line = pv.Line(position, focal_point)

bunny = examples.download_bunny()
xyz = camera.position + unit_vector * 0.6 - np.mean(bunny.points, axis=0)
bunny.translate(xyz, inplace=True)

pl = pv.Plotter(shape=(2, 1))
pl.subplot(0, 0)
pl.add_text("Camera Position")
pl.add_mesh(bunny)
pl.add_mesh(frustum, style="wireframe")
pl.add_mesh(bunny)
pl.add_mesh(line, color="b")
pl.add_point_labels(
    [
        position,
        camera.position + unit_vector * near_range,
        camera.position + unit_vector * far_range,
        focal_point,
    ],
    ["Camera Position", "Near Clipping Plane", "Far Clipping Plane", "Focal Point"],
    margin=0,
    fill_shape=False,
    font_size=14,
    shape_color="white",
    point_color="red",
    text_color="black",
)
pl.camera.position = (1.1, 1.5, 0.0)
pl.camera.focal_point = (0.2, 0.3, 0.3)
pl.camera.up = (0.0, 1.0, 0.0)
pl.camera.zoom(1.4)

pl.subplot(1, 0)
pl.add_text("Camera View")
pl.add_mesh(bunny)
pl.camera = camera
pl.show()
../../_images/camera-1_00_00.png

Controlling Camera Rotation#

In addition to directly controlling the camera position by setting it via the pyvista.Camera.position property, you can also directly control the pyvista.Camera.roll, pyvista.Camera.elevation, and pyvista.Camera.azimuth of the camera.

../../_images/TestCameraModel1.png

For example, you can modify the roll. First, generate a plot of an orientation cube while initially setting the camera position to look at the 'yz'.

import pyvista
from pyvista import demos
pl = demos.orientation_plotter()
pl.camera_position = 'yz'
pl.show()
../../_images/camera-2_00_00.png

Here we modify the roll in-place.

import pyvista
from pyvista import demos
pl = demos.orientation_plotter()
pl.camera_position = 'yz'
pl.camera.roll += 10
pl.show()
../../_images/camera-3_00_00.png

And here we offset the azimuth of the camera by 45 degrees to look at the X+ and Y+ faces.

import pyvista
from pyvista import demos
pl = demos.orientation_plotter()
pl.camera_position = 'yz'
pl.camera.azimuth = 45
pl.show()
../../_images/camera-4_00_00.png

Here, we move upward by setting the elevation of the camera to 45 degrees to see the X+ and Z+ faces.

import pyvista
from pyvista import demos
pl = demos.orientation_plotter()
pl.camera_position = 'yz'
pl.camera.elevation = 45
pl.show()
../../_images/camera-5_00_00.png

API reference#

pyvista.Camera([renderer])

PyVista wrapper for the VTK Camera class.